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Discussion Starter #142
You are the man! At this point, I have an oil temp sensor in the oil pan, so I'm going to see if I need a cooler, but you just re-opened a much neater, cheaper route for me, for which I thank you!

I have the new HO2S in my downpipe, interior buttoned up, only the bumper cover and headlights need to be secured to make it streetable! Just came in from turning it over with the coil unplugged and the plugs out, waiting to get oil pressure before I fire it up. As the oil filter was dry and I put a new, clean (empty) cylinder head on it, it's taken a few 30 second rounds of turning it over so far, and the oil pressure light still hasn't gone out yet. Hoping to fire it up tonight, at least idle! The tune is going to be way, way off, but should be close enough to let it idle and check for leaks. Fingers crossed!
 

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Discussion Starter #143
I've got a self-inflicted wound I'm trying to fix with the Focus, and I need help.

I'm using an Odyssey battery, and long story short, after changing which way the battery box was mounted, I accidentally hooked it up backwards for a second. One heart-stopping, welding-spark inducing second. I secured all of the positives to the negative terminal, then touched the grouped negatives to the positive. Doh! After the spark I yanked it away, and after a couple WTF seconds, I figured out what I'd done. It was enough current to spot weld several washers I was using as spacers together. My first thought was "oh ****, I hope I didn't fry the ECU!"

So, I checked all of the fuses and found nothing blown. Hopes were rising that I hadn't done anything catastrophic. Once I got the rest of the car together, I turned it over with the coil unplugged until I got oil pressure (took awhile, many 30 second cranks between batttery charges to fill an empty oil filter, turbo feed line and new cylinder head.) I was watching my oil pressure gauge and had nothing, finally realized the idiot light had gone out though. Plugged the coil back in and put in new plugs and it fired right up! Ran it for about a minute, then shut it down to check for leaks. However, none of my aftermarket gauges were working. I have them all run off of a terminal strip under the dash (I'll get to that in a second.)

Since then, the car cranks but doesn't start. Also, a bunch of odd stuff occurs, like not being able to turn off the wipers once they start. Turn the key off and back on and they're stopped, but turn them on at the switch and you can't turn them off, or oddly enough, hit the brakes and no brake lights come on, but the wipers start.

I know a lot of odd electrical behavior can be ground related, so I traced all of the grounds except the couple in the rear hatch, and nothing appears damaged. I was certain I was going to find some half-melted ground, having run the power to the grounds accidentally, but everything is clean and tight with no melted wires at the terminals anyway.

For my aftermarket gauges and radar/laser detectors, I'm tapping power off fuse position 52, an unused spot in my fuse panel (under dash "central junction box") normally used for heated seats, as my source for switched ignition power. When the ignition switch is turned on, it energizes a relay I added, which then powers the terminal strip for switched ignition power. This spot in the fuse box is only getting 7.2 volts, not enough to operate the relay. Using the Ford Wiring Diagrams book for the 2002 Focus, it seems everything labeled as coming from source 30S (voltage at all times, switched) is running at 7 volts or so. I'm having a tough time figuring out where exactly this power originates. The radio on fuse 41 is at 12.45V, with a source labeled as 75 (ignition switch in Accessory or Run), so it isn't everything that is effected, and makes me think the ignition switch is okay.

I've replaced all the relays under the hood in the Battery Junction Box, and all the relays in the CJB under the dash test good. There are two diodes that looks like a fuse in the BJB, as well as a fuse/diode labeled as F65/D3 that I haven't replaced as it tests good with the diode-testing function on my multimeter. Tracing stuff back, it seems that a lot of this stuff is controlled by the Generic Electronic Module (GEM), the box with five big plugs on it mounted in the ECU bracket. I had a spare from when I switched ECU's with the guy who had the turbo kit. My original GEM worked with the new ECU with no issues so I left it in, and the spare was originally used with my present ECU, so I switched the GEM, and there was no improvement.

The only thing I could think to do is reload my tune in the ECU, hoping that maybe the tune got zapped but not the ECU. Unfortunately, when I plug in my X2 and try to upload the tune, it does not recognize the ignition switch being on. My Innova scanner shows no codes.

Does anyone have any words of wisdom? Anything else I should check or try? Everything in the BJB that is labeled as hot at all times (30) has full battery voltage to it, I can't find where I'm losing half my power. I have a spare ignition switch, haven't changed that as the switch was not operated during that moment of switched power.

Again, I'm sorry to bother all of you with the results of my carelessness, but I'm at my wits end.
 

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I would check the hot wire to the starter, also think there is an in line fuse in the battery cables. As for the brake lights and wiper open the rubber grommet at the hatch and see which wires shorted on the inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #145
Just an update, had to work today so after I got home I opened the old GEM with a 1S7T-15K600-JC code on it, and nothing appears burned, no odd smells, so I put it back in its housing. Tomorrow I pull the ECU and open it up and see if anything looks bad. On the good, I found an LFQ1 ECU on eBay for $75, so I grabbed it!

I'm going to replace the BJB diodes, as well as all of the CJB relays despite their passing the tests. I will check the the hot wire to the starter tomorrow (fabricated from 2ga welding cable) as well as the stock hot wire off the battery. I had already fixed the broken, shorted wires at the hatch just prior to bringing the car to my new house 2 years ago, but I'll look as well as checking the grounds (work for taillights, brake lights not working.)
 

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Discussion Starter #146 (Edited)
Well, no luck so far. I've changed every relay under the hood and under the dash, tried a different GEM and ECU, and changed the ignition switch, without effect. Car still has only 7V on all the fuses with a source of 30S, and now the car doesn't turn over either. I located and checked all of the chassis ground points, everything is clean and tight, no wires or connectors appear melted or damaged. Battery has 12.5V, and all of the breakers in the under the hood box that are supposed to be hot at all times have 12.5V.

I'm at a loss. Other than taking the wiring harness out and opening it up, I have no idea what to do next. Help me Obi-Wan, you're my only hope....
 

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Discussion Starter #147 (Edited)
You know, the problem with finally saying "help!" is that, when you find out that it was something simple, and something of your own doing that caused the problem, you feel like suuuuuuuch a douche!

Long story short, I missed a ground wire that was supposed to go to the battery. I believe the timeline was start the car, and find the three Autometer gauges I added in the dash aren't working. At some point I removed that battery, took the panel under the steering wheel on the dash off (I have my accessory terminal strips for switched ignition power, light power, and ground mounted here) and then hooked the battery back up, overlooking one ground wire that went to the battery. I then found half my fuse panel with 5.5-7.2V. This would not energize the relay that powered my gauges, and I said "Aha! Here's the problem!"

As I had previously hooked the battery up backwards momentarily, I assumed the worst and proceeded to throw parts at the problem. It wasn't until nothing else solved the problem and I had started unwrapping the main engine compartment harness from the battery to the under hood junction box, and disassembling the junction box looking for melted wires, that I stumbled across one ground wire that wasn't on the bolt I had the rest of them on.

"Oh no, could it be....."

I put everything back together, hooked up the battery along with this wire, and tada! The car turns over and instantly starts.

However, the 3 gauges that started this still don't seem to be working. I know it hasn't warmed up enough to get the water or oil temp gauges to move, but dammit, the oil pressure gauge should be working! I confirm again that the terminal strips I used have power and ground, and they do. Now I go under the car, and the sender wire is connected and tight. When in doubt, go back to the directions that came with the gauge. "The sender will ground through the threads..." it says, BUT..." in high vibration or full race applications, we suggest remote mounting the sender. In this case, the sender may need a separate ground."

As mine is on a braided steel line to get it away from the motor, I look over the chain of adapters I have off of this hose in order to supply oil pressure to the turbo, the oil pressure idiot light sender, and the oil pressure gauge sender and realize "that's a lot of teflon tape for a ground to traverse."



I attach a test lead with alligator clamps to the sender body and run it to the block, and like magic, my oil pressure gauge comes to life! Yay!

So while I'm mortified that I cried out for help and found it to be a basic screw-up, continuing my role of being the example not to follow, I'm glad I'm not having to tell the tale about how I took out the entire dash to replace the main harness before I found the problem!

On to tuning!
 

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Glad to see its working again. I would have chimed in but electrical is NOT my forte lol.
 

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Christ, has it really been almost three years since I posted anything about my ZX3?

Due to outside issues, I had to switch my screen name. The "84278" now on previous posts is a mystery to me, but I am the one who posted those posts!

The car runs like a scalded cat now, though that doesn't mean there haven't been issues! I'm getting the alternator rebuilt today after suffering yet another self-inflicted wound. I picked up my son from this mothers house when he got in town on leave, and as we left I showed him how the Turbo Focus pulls! After the second corner and some throttle to scoot ahead of traffic, I noticed some wisps of smoke coming from under the hood at the next stop light. Glancing over at the oil pressure gauge, I see nothing. Zip. Turn the car off in a big hurry, happy that it didn't make expensive broken engine sounds, but not happy at the oil dripping everywhere. After looking around and seeing nothing obvious, I had the car towed home.

Long story short, I had a braided stainless oil line coming off the back of the block where the stock oil pressure idiot light sending unit goes, running up to a tee fitting where the same idiot light sender now resides, the sender for the oil pressure gauge, and then has another braided stainless line continuing on to feed the turbo with oil. Wait, that's too many outlets. It must be a tee on another tee. The point is this;That first braided line off the block apparently made contact with the power lug on the alternator. The subsequent arcing melted through the rubber inner line, and allowed the oil pressure to drop and sprayed hot oil all over the alternator. Once I replaced the oil line with Aeroquip socketless AQP hose and fittings, I fired it up and found I had oil pressure, I had no oil leaks, and I had no electricity being generated by the alternator! So, then I wrestled the alternator off that car (a lovely experience around the Jay Racing intake!) and off she went to the rebuilder.

Let me pause here to praise the true professional. What joy it is to bring an alternator in to someone who's been rebuilding them and starters for decades. He can recognize issues and suggest fixes, and I never, NOT ONCE, am asked "what make, model and year." He can tell me, just by looking at it.

The electrical rebuilder is sure my dead alternator is an RPM issue, that the shorting may have killed my oil line, but it was RPM that killed the alternator. He says the Focus is a 3:1 step up in RPM, so when I was seeing 7000 rpm, the poor alternator was seeing 21,000! He pressed a bigger pulley on the alternator to slow it down, and I'll have to fit a longer belt. Stock is 83.5", not sure if I'll try 84" or 84.5" at first. Try that at Auto Zone.

I'm doing all of my own tuning with the Pro Racer package, and once you start using it and datalogging, it starts to make sense. I'm datalogging with LiveLink 6.5, but then using the Histogram feature in LiveLink Gen II. What a revelation! See it here! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCkSOXcmg8w

It makes Soooo much more sense when you can sort through all the data to see what AFR you are seeing at what rpm or throttle position vs MAF counts, etc. That was when it finally made sense to me, and my subsequent tunes got much better! I'm blessed to live in the country with straight farm roads, and have been able to data log on them. I'm still planning on getting on a dyno and making sure the tune is safe at the very top, and to get some numbers that aren't based on a WAG!

More soon! I know FJ isn't what it once was, but I'm partly to blame for that by not posting for 2.667 years.
 

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So my brake lights on both sides stopped working, but I had the top third brake light working. I replaced the turn signal switch, as this seems to be the most common culprit in this circumstance, as the side brake lights also go through this "multifunction switch" as the turn signals interrupt the brake lights to give the "blink."

...And that didn't fix it! The turn signals and hazards worked still, so the only other possibility was the Generic Electronic Module (GEM), that has five plugs going into it and mounts onto the ECU bracket under the right kick panel. Voila, it worked! Nice to figure THAT one out!

In other news, I was thinking about converting to E85. It seems that while our systems can support E85 at stock-ish HP levels with tuning, turbo motors need a return style fuel system. I'll probably put that off until I upgrade the turbo to a GTX3071R from my present GT28RS. Time to enjoy the car as is!
 

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hello all, to anyone who still visits this once glorious forum!

I stumbled onto something on the interwebs that I thought might be of interest to some. The thought of a RWD Focus has tempted many, but the Zetec has been tough to mate to a standard transmission. Quad4Rods made a bellhousing for awhile, but it was expensive and recent searches suggest they may be out of business.

Then I found this;



"In the late 80's OMC used the Ford 2.3 OHC as an inboard motor. In order to mate that engine to the OMC outdrive, they cast an adapter. On the 2.3 OHC engine there are two different bolt patterns - the usual 2.3 pattern and the older "pinto" pattern. The main difference is the location of the two upper bolts. OMC used the "pinto" pattern which happens to be the same as the Zetec. That "pinto" pattern is also found on the 2.0 OHC, 1600, 1.9CVH, and the 2.3/2/5 HSC engines.

The OMC outdrive is based on a Chevy V8 bellhousing pattern. So, the OMC adapter has a Zetec pattern interfaced with the Chevy bell pattern. The starter holes are indexed allow a Mustang/Ranger 2.3 starter with the Ford 2.3 or Escort 1.9 flywheel, either of which will fit the Zetec.

So, by bolting the adapter to the engine, you can bolt on an inexpensive corporate Chevy bell. That makes transmission possibilities pretty broad. Muncie 3 or4 spd, T5, NV3500, T56, 700R4, 200-4R, 4L60, or even a 2 spd Powerglide. And because the pilot shaft on a typical GM transmission is the same as the Zetec (.590", no special pilot bushing is needed.)
Only a few easy things are needed to use this plate:
1. make a stepped index bushing for the engine side (.600" to .500"),
2. drill for a .625" transmission index bushing on the transmission side,
3. modify the Zetec pan to clear the low mounted starter like we did for the MGB, (a 15 minute job on the bandsaw),
4. Trim the adapter to fit around the rear main seal on the Zetec.


I just bought one off of eBay, but I don't have a T5 with a Chevy bellhousing yet. As I figure out what parts are necessary to make this work, I'll put it up here. 5 of the bolt holes line up, I hope that's enough because the sixth one is where the starter currently dwells!

Denny
 

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Ooops, the part number if you want one is OMC P/N 0914081 ENGINE ADAPTER. I'm told it is still available new for $150, I got mine off fleabay for $60 delivered~!
 

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I'm glad I read this. I may have to try this out. My neighbor has some Chevy parts, I have a spare T5 and Focus body and 8.8 rear axle.
 

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Cool! Keep in mind that not all T5’s have the same pattern bell housing, and that there’s a wide variety of ratios out there. A T5 out of a V8 ford mustang will not fit, the end of the input shaft is too big to fit the pilot bearing, but a Chevy one will fit. A T5 out of an Astrovan (yes, they did come in them) would be ideal. A good resource for figuring out what T5 you are looking at is http://www.britishv8.org/articles/borg-warner-t5-id-tags.htm


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